Philippines Angeles Mission


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Description

More information coming soon!

We are still collecting information on the Philippines Angeles Mission. If you served in this mission and are willing to share your experiences with us, please contact us at editor@missionhome.com

Snapshot of the Philippines – English and Tagalog (also known as Filipino) are the two official languages of the Philippines, though there are several other major regional languages, most notably Cebuano (spoken in the Central Visayas region), Ilokano (spoken in northern Luzon), and Hiligaynon (spoken in the western Visayas and Mindanao). About 90% of the population in the Philippines is Christian, with the vast majority belonging to the Roman Catholic Church. However, a few southern areas, including the Sulu Archipelago, have a primarily Muslim population. Philippine culture is influenced by Malay, Spanish, and American cultures. Events such as barrio fiestas (neighborhood festivals) are common events featuring music, food, and dancing. The use of English as an official language has helped make many American trends popular in the Philippines as well, such as fast food, rock and hip hop music, and films. Basketball is the most popular sport in the Philippines, though boxing, soccer, and volleyball are also popular. The Philippine martial art style Arnis is considered the national martial art. Eating out and regular snacks between main meals are popular in the Philippines. Rice is one of the staple foods in the Philippine. Corn, adobo (meat stew using pork or chicken), meat and vegetable rolls, seafood, empanadas, and several varieties of fruit and vegetable are also commonly eaten. Roasted pig is often served as the main course for festivals and special occasions.

 

The Church

There are a lot of members of the LDS church in this area. The typical ward has 500-600 members. There is also a high inactivity rate, so most missionaries work hard on retention. Most new-convert baptisms are children, women and families.

Food

Eating out and regular snacks between main meals are popular in the Philippines. Rice is one of the staple foods in the country. Corn, adobo (meat stew using pork or chicken), meat and vegetable rolls, seafood, empanadas, and several varieties of fruit and vegetable are also commonly eaten. Roasted pig is often served as the main course for festivals and special occasions.

Transportation

This is a walking mission; however, missionaries may take public transportation where it’s available.

Safety

In terms of crime, the area is relatively safe. Natural disasters are a concern in this area, but the mission will have specific safety guidelines for natural disasters and other emergencies.

Customs

Events such as barrio fiestas (neighborhood festivals) are common and typically feature music, food, and dancing. The use of English as an official language has helped make many American trends popular in the Philippines as well, such as fast food, rock and hip hop music, and films. Basketball is the most popular sport in the Philippines, though boxing, soccer, and volleyball are also popular. The Philippine martial art style Arnis is considered the national martial art.

Local Lingo

kumusta……hello

magandang araw…..good day

salamat…….thank you

 

Essential Equipment

Rubber shoes are essential to the area. If you can’t buy rubber shoes before you leave, they are available in the Philippines.

Flag of Philippines Angeles Mission

Profile

Philippines
President Scott B. Clark

F. Tañedo Street
Barangay San Nicolas,
Tarlac City, 2300 Tarlac
Philippines

English, Filipino
317,398
Roman Catholicism
70–90 degrees F
Angeles, Mabalacat City, San Fernando

Experiences

Straight from the Philippines Angeles Mission:

*What items were hard to get or not available?
“Milk, cheese”

*What did you eat the most of?
“Rice, tilapia, bananas”

*What is the craziest thing you ate?
“Fried bugs”

*What was most surprising about the culture?
“The superstitions of people who are close to the land are very strong, even after gospel conversion.”

*What advice would you give to someone going to the Philippines Angeles Mission?
“Even though things are done differently and seem inefficient do not think that you know it all because you are an American.

*What do you wish you had known before you served?
“More about church organizational structure.”

*Other comments?

**Did you serve in the Philippines Angeles Mission? If so we could love to hear your advice and your stories! Please contact us at editor@missionhome.com**