Mexico Monterrey East Mission


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View of San Jerónimo, Monterrey, Mexico

View of San Jerónimo, Monterrey, Mexico

Snapshot of Mexico – Spanish is the official language of Mexico. Mexico is an ethnically diverse country, with many people being descendents from both indigenous groups and European immigrants, though the southern part of the country has significantly higher levels of indigenous peoples than other areas. These southern and central regions are also home to several indigenous languages, such as Nahuatl and Yukatek Maya. Over 80% of Mexico’s population belongs to the Roman Catholic church, with attendance rates at about 47%. Many Mexican towns and cities have their own patron saints, which are celebrated with yearly feasts. Both Spanish and indigenous influences can be seen in art, architecture, and music. Mariachi performing groups (bands using singers, guitars, trumpets, and other instruments) regularly perform at festivals and restaurants, and many folk dances and traditional music are still practiced. Rock, pop, and other music styles such as norteña and ranchera are popular today. Soccer is the most popular sport in Mexico, though baseball is also popular. Lucha libre wrestling and bullfighting are also popular events. Mexican cuisine is based on the staples of corn, beans, and chili peppers, often used with meat, cheese, and other herbs and spices. Traditionally, the main meal is eaten during the afternoon. A soup is served first, followed by a meat dish with sauce and salsa, along with tortillas and beans. Street vendors are also quite popular, selling tacos, quesadillas, tortas, roasted chicken, and other dishes. Bacon-wrapped hot dogs are another popular street vendor food. Cuisine varies in different regions, with flour tortillas, burritos, cheese, and beef being more popular in the north, while tropical fruits and tamales are more commonly used in southern cooking. Seafood, morisqueta (a sausage and rice meal), and carnitas (deep-fried pork) are more commonly eaten in western Mexico.

Mexico is an ethnically diverse country, with many people being descendants from both indigenous groups and European immigrants. Monterrey, is the capital city of the northeastern state of Nuevo León in the country of Mexico. The city is the third-largest metropolitan area in Mexico. Monterrey is a commercial center and is the base of many significant international corporations. Monterrey is one of Mexico’s more developed cities. Rich in history and culture, Monterrey is often referred to as the most “Americanized” city in the entire country.

Food

Mexican cuisine is based on a steady dose of corn, chili peppers, and beans, often paired with meat, cheese, and other herbs and spices. Commonly the main meal is eaten during the afternoon. Traditionally a soup is served first, followed by a meat dish with sauce and salsa, along with tortillas and beans. Street vendors are found all over Monterrey, selling tacos, quesadillas, tortas, roasted chicken, and other dishes. Bacon-wrapped hot dogs are another popular food sold by street vendors. Flour tortillas, burritos, cheese, and beef are quite popular in the north.

What maybe the most traditional dish from Monterrey is cabrito, kid goat cooked on embers. Other local dishes and customs are the “semita,” the capirotada dessert (a mix of cooked bread, cheese, raisins, peanuts, and crystallized sugarcane juice), and the relative absence of pork dishes. Another famous local dish is machacado con huevo. Carne asada is commonly prepared as a weekend family gathering tradition. It is usually prepared with grilled onions, baked potatoes and sausages or chopped as tacos. Locally brewed beer and cola are a must to be paired with the barbecue. The traditional desserts, “glorias” and “obleas,” made from goat milk are both traditional candies from Nuevo León.

Cabrito with tamales

Cabrito with tamales

Transportation

Monterrey is linked with the USA border,  inland Mexico, and the sea through a group of roads, including the Carretera Nacional (Panamerican Highway), and the Carretera; it is also crossed by highways 40, 45, 57.

There are several between-cities bus lines at the bus station downtown. The city has a rapid transit system called Metrorrey, which currently has 2 lines.

Monterrey is also connected by three railroad freight lines: Nuevo Laredo-Mexico City, Monterrey-Tampico, and Monterrey-Pacific (Mazatlán).

The city is served by two international airports: General Mariano Escobedo International Airport and Del Norte International Airport, a primarily private airport.

Cuauhtemoc Metrorrey (the Monterrey Metro)

Cuauhtemoc Metrorrey (the Monterrey Metro)

Safety

In 2005, Monterrey was ranked as the safest city in Latin America and Mexico. Although drug cartels exist in the area military offensives and police captures of important drug-cartel chiefs have weakened drug cartels trying to settle in the city. The city is safe to travel by day and night; nevertheless, precaution and common sense should be considered in certain districts at night.

There are two police departments guarding the city, the Police of the City of Monterrey (Policía Regia), dependent of the municipal government, and the State Public Safety. The Policía Regia protects the city’s downtown and main areas, while the State Public Safety is in charge of the farthest areas.

Customs

Many Mexican towns and cities have their own patron saints, which are celebrated with yearly feasts. Both Spanish and indigenous influences can be seen in art, architecture, and music. Mariachi performing groups regularly perform in all places, and many folk dances and traditional music are still practiced. Rock, pop, and other music styles such as norteña and ranchera are popular today. Soccer is the most popular sport in Mexico, though baseball is also present. Lucha libre wrestling and bullfighting are also popular events.

 

Flag of Mexico Monterrey East Mission

Profile

Mexico
President Larry C. Bird

Cerralvo # 134
Col. Libertad
67130 Guadalupe, Nuevo Leon
Mexico

Spanish
1.136 million
Catholicism, Evangelicals, Pentecostals, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Seventh Day Adventists, LDS
Monterrey is one of the warmest big cities in Mexico. It reaches 104 °F or more for three consecutive months during the summertime. Its climate is semi-arid. During the spring and autumn season the weather is temperate. The average high in August is 95 °F and the average low is 73 °F. Winters are mild. The average January high is 70 °F and the average low in January is 46 °F; temperatures below freezing are unusual. There is not much rainfall in the winter. Rainfall is more frequent from May to September. Seasons are not very consistent. Monterrey may frequently experience extreme weather changes. Although it may be winter time, temperatures may rise to 85°F. The most extreme weather changes in summer usually come with some rainfall. The warm season may start in February and may last until September.. Snow is extremely rare but has occurred in the past.
Apodaca, Escobedo, García, Guadalupe, Santiago, Juárez, San Nicolás de los Garza,San Pedro Garza García, and Santa Catarina.

Experiences

*What did you eat the most of?
“We had a great variety of food. And the sisters were very nice to help me with my special diet.”

*What is the craziest thing you ate?
“One Of our Zone leader made a dish with chile del arbol…I asked if it had chile he said just a little…I thought I was going to die…”

*What was most surprising about the culture?

*What advice would you give to someone going to the Mexico Monterrey East Mission?
“I wish the missionaries (younger) could learn more about dealing with the different personalities and what to do with certain situations but I was older and had lots of experiences and I new to rely in the Lord for absolutely everything.”
-Hazel

*What do you wish you had known before you served?
“Ask..knock..seek…my testimony of solving problems by kneeling and praying is so beautiful..but you have to give something is you want to receive..I did not have to do or say anything He took care of everything…I completely love my mission, we got to be Temple workers with my Senior companions..that is another story.”
-Hazel

*Other comments?
“I grew up in El Salvador, I felt the the need of sharing our precious treasure to everybody..to know the amazing love of our Savior, we all want to love and be loved.”
-Hazel

**Did you serve in the Mexico Monterrey East Mission? If so we would love to hear your advice and your stories! Please contact us at editor@missionhome.com**