Arizona Phoenix Mission


View Larger Map

Description

The Phoenix Arizona mission is located in the dry and warm climate of Arizona. Part of the mission is in downtown Phoenix and suburbs surrounding Phoenix, and another part of the mission empcompasses Indian reservations. Missionaries should expect to tract in a variety of areas from large cities, to busy suburbs, and Indian reservations. Recently, more and more missionaries are living in members basements or attached apartment complex. Other missionaries live in apartments.

Phoenix at night

Phoenix at night

 

**Did you serve in the Arizona Phoenix Mission? If so we want to hear from you! Share your experiences here or by emailing us at editor@missionhome.com**

The Church

The Arizona Phoenix Mission was organized on July 1, 1984. Currently there is a temple that is under construction in Phoenix and will likely be finished by the end of 2013. The mission in Phoenix recently went digital and many missionaries carry ipads for proselyting purposes with digital planners and area guides.

Food

Local food consists of a blend of tex-mex, hispanic, and a bit of navajo food. Navajo food consists of fried tacos and enchilada style soups. Because of the strong hispanic presence in Arizona, Elders will likely be served hispanic cuisine by members or have hispanic food available for purchase at local restaurants. Hispanic food consists of tacos, enchiladas, taquitos, soups, and chips. Most dishes are meats, tomatoes and cheese wrapped in corn or flour flat bread and traditional mexican seasoning. Hispanic food can be spicey. Tex-mex cuisine is a blend of Mexican and Texas food. It is often described as hispanic food with American flavors. Traditional American style food is also readily available.

Transportation

Most missionaries get around on bikes, though there are cars for larger areas. Missionaries often invest in bus passes in large city areas. Missionaries should expect to bike in the heat in cold at some point of their mission.

Customs

Missionaries sometimes teach lessons in the dark during the day because Arizonans are very concerned with saving power. People are very willing to share water and tend to be compassionate with missionaries tracking in the sun all day, but are not interested in listening. There is a wide array of social economic status, from the most poor to the wealthiest in the United States.Phoenix 2

Local Lingo

Lingo is similar to the rest of the united states, except on Indian reservations. Indians can have slightly different speech patterns and words than most Americans. It is recommended that missionaries learn a little Spanish, whether they are called to speak Spanish or not. There is a strong Hispanic population in Arizona, and it benefits missionaries to be able to converse with all types of people.

Essential Equipment

Lingo is similar to the rest of the united states, except on Indian reservations. Indians can have slightly different speech patterns and words than most Americans. It is recommended that missionaries learn a little Spanish, whether they are called to speak Spanish or not. There is a strong Hispanic population in Arizona, and it benefits missionaries to be able to converse with all types of people.

Phoenix 1

Flag of Arizona Phoenix Mission

Profile

United States
President Spencer Griffin

18001 N 79th Ave Ste C50
Glendale AZ 85308-8394
United States

English
1.469 Million
Catholicism, LDS, Baptist
Subtropical Desert Climate
Glendale, Scottsdale, Mesa, Gilbert

Experiences

What items were hard to get or not available?

Nothing really. It is in the South West US, so most amenities are still available.

What did you eat the most of?

A lot of Tex-Mex food, enchiladas mainly. But lots of Utah-Mormon meals as well, since it is a Mormon-dense area.

What is the craziest thing you ate?

Not much to be scared of. A mexican member threatened to feed us cow tongue, just to scare us, but that never happened. All of my food was pretty tame.

What was most surprising about the culture

Lots of people don’t turn on their lights during the day, to reduce the heat and energy consumption. So it was weird teaching lessons in the dark. People are very willing to share water and compassion, but many aren’t interested in listening. You will find a wide variety of economic status, from lower middle class all the way up to the 1%.

What advice would you give to someone going to this Mission?

Learn a little Spanish (unless thats the language you are called to speak), because it can help to bear your testimony, or give a pass-a-long card, or ask for the Spanish Missionaries to come back. Working with members is key in an area like Phoenix, because the membership is large and strong, and references are a lot more successful than finding on your own. And lastly, some bike maintenance is helpful. You can pick it up in the field, but more often than not you will be in a bike area which means flat tires and other headaches.

What were your housing accommodations?

They are always making a huge push for “consecrated housing,” which means housing options from members. You will probably live in an apartment on member’s property, or perhaps in their basement, or even in an apartment complex. Bottom line: its always a little cramped, but very livable. You’ll have thrift-store furniture, but your showers will have hot/cold water.

The APM is the best mission in the world! You bring the living water to a thirsty land. Love the cacti, and the rocks, and the adobe. Its wonderful and I miss it terribly!

 **Did you serve in the Arizona Phoenix Mission? If so we want to hear from you! Share your experiences here or by emailing us at editor@missionhome.com**